Enrique Monzón

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3,525 kmfrom home
#iamamigrant
“It would have been harder to survive a chronic illness in my home country”
Enrique Monzón
Occupation: 
Retired
Current Country: 
United States
Country of Origin: 
Guatemala

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I have been living in the United States for 33 years. I had a job in my country, but at that time it was not enough to buy a bicycle, much less to buy a car or a house, which was the most important thing for me at that time.

In the United States I was able to achieve all of it while also helping my relatives who were still in Guatemala City. I have contact with them and every time I can, I visit them. This was particularly difficult before because I was one of the many undocumented in this city, however with the correct advice I obtained the residency and later on, the citizenship.

I had a very critical health complication and the citizenship process was faster. When they are special cases, authorities provide certain benefits and it is one of the disadvantages for staying in Guatemala. It would have been harder to survive a chronic illness in my home country.

Not everything went that way when I arrived in California. Finding a job was somewhat difficult since in the eighties the Spanish-speaking population was small and in most companies required English; I did not speak any. My heart breaks every time I remember the situations I had to go through to find work.

 

I think that if authorities had caught me on the road, back then, I would have gone back to Guatemala. It was a moment in which we could find security on the road and supportive people with whom to count so that one did not need anything. Nowadays there are many dangers and mistrust is increasing every time.

I believe that job opportunities have characteristics similar to those of 30 years ago. In the city, those who work are able to take their families forward. For women, the situation becomes somewhat difficult, since a good part of the jobs are very heavy and companies prefer to give them to men.

I have been living in the United States for 33 years. I had a job in my country, but at that time it was not enough to buy a bicycle, much less to buy a car or a house, which was the most important thing for me at that time.

In the United States I was able to achieve all of it while also helping my relatives who were still in Guatemala City. I have contact with them and every time I can, I visit them. This was particularly difficult before because I was one of the many undocumented in this city, however with the correct advice I obtained the residency and later on, the citizenship.

I had a very critical health complication and the citizenship process was faster. When they are special cases, authorities provide certain benefits and it is one of the disadvantages for staying in Guatemala. It would have been harder to survive a chronic illness in my home country.

Not everything went that way when I arrived in California. Finding a job was somewhat difficult since in the eighties the Spanish-speaking population was small and in most companies required English; I did not speak any. My heart breaks every time I remember the situations I had to go through to find work.

I think that if authorities had caught me on the road, back then, I would have gone back to Guatemala. It was a moment in which we could find security on the road and supportive people with whom to count so that one did not need anything. Nowadays there are many dangers and mistrust is increasing every time.

I believe that job opportunities have characteristics similar to those of 30 years ago. In the city, those who work are able to take their families forward. For women, the situation becomes somewhat difficult, since a good part of the jobs are very heavy and companies prefer to give them to men.

Related Sustainable Development Goal(s):

 

https://together.un.org            http://usaim.org/            https://sustainabledevelopment.un.org